Covid-19 Journal #5 – March 28, 2020

Ocean demonstrating her pizza-making skills

The government is taking stronger measures everyday to enforce social distancing. They are tightening controls of movement and limiting groups to under 3 people. Some of the guards at the school couldn’t make it across the city to work today and another teaching couple got stopped by police while walking their dogs.

I managed to go on a bike ride this morning along the canals. There were a few people exercising and a lot more police. There was a lot less traffic and so made it very nice for a cyclist. I hope I can continue to cycle everyday. No one stopped me and I tried to keep my social distance from others. The afternoon was my nap on the topchan and then some school work.

Riding Along the Canal is a Source of Solace for Me

Disasters always have a silver lining and with Covid-19, I am spending more time with my family. Ocean and I made pizzas last night and Oliver and I have played a lot of table tennis. That is a funny sport. It is basically a toy version of tennis. Is there another sport like that?

Happy Birthday Nadia

We celebrated Nadia’s birthday, January 26, 2020, with a stay at the local Hyatt Regency. This is Nadia’s favorite place in Tashkent! We had a nice dinner at the Italian restaurant on the top floor Saturday evening. The next day we had a long breakfast, watched Australian Open tennis and went for a swim in the afternoon before checking out. It was a relaxing stay for us.

We were greeted with a light covering of snow in the morning.

The Hyatt treated us right with a birthday cake in the morning!

Day on the Slopes

Owen and I at the Top of Amirsoy

I always say that any day I am outdoors more than indoors, it is a good day. We really enjoyed a day at the new Amirsoy Resort. We didn’t have school yesterday and it was not a national holiday so it was the perfect day to go skiing. With no waiting times for the chair life and gondola, we had the slopes almost to ourselves.

Owen is getting better as a snowboarder. He switched to snowboarding on a school trip last year in Japan and continues to develop his skills. I was a bit out of sorts yesterday, being a little slow thinking and lethargic, but as the day progressed, I felt more comfortable. After lunch, a heavy snow softened the hard edges and it was pure pleasure to swoosh lightly through the deep powder. It was snowing and blowing so heavily at the top of the mountain that the resort closed the highest slopes in the afternoon.

Refreshing Mountain Views

It would be nice for the school to develop ways to integrate winter sports into our physical education curriculum. With lift tickets/rental under $35 per person and the resort only a 90-minute drive, it is possible. I hope to come back a couple more times this winter.

Kralovec Family Basketball

It was a grand day last Saturday with Owen, Oliver and Ocean all playing in basketball games. Owen is a junior and a starter on the Tashkent International School varsity boys high school team. Grade 8 Oliver is on the junior varsity team and Grade 6 Ocean is on the middle school girls team. The joy of watching our children participate in interscholastic team sports was tinged with a bit of sadness. I wish my parents were alive to see them play. My mom and dad were avid supporters of youth sports and loved nothing better than to watch their children play sports. They would have been beaming with love and pride to see their grandchildren on the basketball floor.

An historic moment – Ocean’s first basketball game!

Ocean was the hero of the day! She has played a lot growing up with two brothers and it showed on the court. At another game this week, she made the winning basket (see YouTube video above).

I love watching Oliver play. He plays with reckless abandon and loves to be physical. His happy-go-lucky attitude in life shows on the court and he truly enjoys the competition and camaraderie of being on a team. He has a big frame and uses it to his advantage.

A proud dad!

Owen has a passion for sport and is an outstanding ball handler and rebounder. It is strange to have a left-handed son but I get so much pleasure from being around the team as an assistant coach and interacting with Owen and his teammates. I try to teach them the fundamentals of basketball and give them insights into how to win more games.

Interscholastic sports at international schools have not become intense like US public and private schools. It is a bit old-fashioned with practices 3 times per week and 10-15 games per season. I just want for my children to get the experience of playing on a team, learning the sport, deal with winning and losing and be active.

They have culminating Central Asia and Tashkent tournaments coming up next month and I will be blogging more and include highlights of Owen’s games.

Amirsoy Skiing

Ocean Ready To Go!

I took the kids yesterday to the new ski resort near Tashkent, Amirsoy. An international ski management company from Andorra, Pas Grau International (PGI), is managing the facility. It opened with great fanfare last month. There were many people at the resort due to January 2 being a national holiday here in Uzbekistan. However, most of the crowds were non-skiers, which was really strange. Hundreds of locals bought a ticket for a ride up the gondola to the top of the mountain. It was surreal for skiers, which thankfully had a different line, to get off the gondola and weave their way through sightseers at the top of the run. Skiing is new here and most Uzbeks do not know how to ski. It is also expensive, considering the average monthly salary here is around $300. I hope with the economy improving here, more locals will be able to use the resort.

Owen is getting better on the snowboard

During the day, several English-speaking Uzbeks saw that I was a foreigner and pulled me aside to talk about the resort. I sensed the disbelief and pride in their voices that an international standard ski resort was now operating in the Chimgan Mountains of Uzbekistan. Here is a video introducing Amirsoy (link).

Oliver made it with ease down the slopes

We had a really nice day, despite some confusion in getting our ski passes and equipment rental in the morning. As with most things here, it is inexpensive with an all-day ski pass costing $26 and rental equipment around $15. It is an affordable day out for me and three children. It is not a big resort, with six major routes. From the top, one can ski over 3,500 meters to the bottom which is really enjoyable and tiring. There were a couple of patches dirt lower down the mountain. PGI is building more snow-making machines to cover those areas. However, on the top, the snow was fine, although some of the runs are a bit narrow for beginners. There are three red routes (Europe classification suitable for intermediates) and one blue route. They have the main gondola for 8 people with two stops and a side chair lift for 4 people on a good intermediate run.

My nephew Sebey is enjoying a break

They have chalets for rent and it would be nice to stay for a couple of days. There are not enough slopes to make it worth a full week, but 3 days of skiing would be perfect. It is about a 1 hour and 20-minute drive from our home. We left at 7:45 AM to arrive when it opened at 9:00 AM. Due to the large crowds, they ran out of food at the restaurant near the chair lift. This is part of the growing pains of a new resort.

The Chimgan Mountains are high enough to attract and keep enough snow, even in this time of global warming. With the addition of some snow-making equipment, they could extend the season and make it work. I hope PGI will make it work with Amirsoy.

Samarkand

Nadia and Alejandra are dwarfed by a madrassa on the Registan

It makes sense that before extensive maritime transportation that Eurasia, with its massive landmass, would be where the longest trade routes were located. Trade between China, Rome, Persia, India and others peaked before the start of ocean-going long haul ships. Samarkand, a two-hour high-speed train from Tashkent, was one of the most important trading cities in the silk road network.

I was in awe standing at night in the Registan and thinking of all of the great names in history who had come through Samarkand. Alexander the Great, Marco Polo, Genghis Khan, Timur (Tamerlane) all spent much time in the city. They would not have had the view we did that evening because of course at that time, there was not electricity. I wonder what they would have thought to stand there with us in 2019?

Courtyard

The Registan (Persian language meaning sandy place or desert) was the central plaza, the heart of the city and back in the day, probably a busy market. Today, the main bazaar moved down the street and the Soviets and Uzbeks have created a clear space on the Registan so people can admire the three madrassas that form the borders of the clearing. The architecture, colors, designs and size of the madrassas are truly breathtaking and I see why it was made a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The muqarnas, or vaulted arches with the tiled designs of different blues, made me want to paint them. The different hues of blue tiles with intricate designs blend perfectly with the beige bricks and brown sand and mountains that surround the city. I hope to learn more about Islamic architecture during my time in Uzbekistan.

Photo Opportunity at the Registan

Samarkand today is Uzbekistan’s second city with a population around 1 million people in the metro area. The little over 300 kilometer distance takes 2-hours on a high-speed train. It is quite convenient for us because the train station is close to our house. My only complaint was half of the seats in the train face backwards on every journey. I wish they had the reversible seats like or turn the trains around in the station. It is better than the 4-hour+ drive. Samarkand was originally a Persian city and the majority of the population speaks Tajik, which is an Iranian language. Many Iranians almost moved to Samarkand in the 1800s. Walking around the city, I noticed the the Tajiks/Iranians have a bit darker skin and have slighter builds than Uzbeks.

Taking a break on the ruins of Afrosiab

We spent the second day wandering around the hills and ruins of the ancient city of Marakanda. This was the original Samarkand, when it was controlled by the Sogdians, an Iranian/Persian tribe that had a huge empire starting around 500 BC. It is a huge archeological site (500 acres+) just north of the city and has been preserved by the Soviets and the current Uzbek government. It was an ancient walled city. The Sogdians survived Alexander the Great taking the city in 329 BC, the Arabs in 712 AD and finally, dwindled away after Ghengis Khan wrecked Marakanda in 1220. It wasn’t until Timur conquered the area and made his capital in present day Samarkand in the 1300s.

Walking Around the Renovated Tourist Area of Samarkand

It made for a nice afternoon for me and the boys. Much better than trailing my wife and her sister through the markets and tourist shops. The area is large and I wonder how much is still underneath. We visited the museum and learned there are three areas, including a citadel. It is called Afrasiyab settlement and can be reached on foot from the Registan. You can kind of make out where they are with faint foundations and hills. We found some cool earthen caves on the sides of hills, which are probably used by herders tending their sheep as they graze over the area. We looked for some ancient pottery and threw a lot of rocks. We did a big loop around the grounds and checked out the most interesting areas. It was nice to have free reign over the area and not signs or guides prohibiting exploration.

Winter Holidays in Tashkent Journal

Ocean asked me to go with her to Ice City, a new winter sports amusement center in Tashkent. We made Oliver go with us and we had a lot of laughs. I especially liked the speed skating ring. They even had an indoor bunny hill for skiers. I just love spending time with my family during the holidays.

A cold evening at the Tashkent International Airport

Last night and again this afternoon, we went to the airport to pick up Nadia’s father and her sister and nephew. The Tashkent International Airport is unusual in that people must wait outside the arrivals terminal and cannot enter the building. With temperatures hovering around zero, we were uncomfortable. I really enjoyed it however, just spending time with my family, joking around and waiting with anticipation for our relatives to exit the terminal.

Still cold during the day

I had a headache today and took it easy most of the day. Yesterday however, I did get out for a ride along the canals. It was quite refreshing and I hope to ride more often during the break.

Ankhor Canal